ebookclassics

The Moonstone – Read-a-Long

BeFunky_moonstonecover.jpgOn October 31st, I was stressed out not only because I didn’t know whether rain was going to ruin trick or treating plans (i.e., I would be stuck with costumed and grumpy kids all night), but because I knew The Moonstone read-a-long was starting the next day and I was already way behind in The Count of Monte Cristo read-a-long. Should I still join in? Should I try reading it another time? I don’t think I even made a conscious decision; I just turned on my ereader on Friday morning and started reading.

The Moonstone (1868) by Wilkie Collins is a 19th-century British epistolary novel, generally considered the first detective novel in the English language. The story was originally serialised in Charles Dickens’ magazine All the Year Round. The Moonstone and The Woman in White are considered Wilkie Collins’ best novels. Besides creating many of the ground rules of the detective novel, The Moonstone also reflected Collins’ enlightened social attitudes in his treatment of the servants in the novel. Collins adapted The Moonstone for the stage in 1877, but the production was performed for only two months.

(From Wikipedia)

I’m so pleased to be joining The Moonstone read-a-long with Ellie @ Literary Nerds Unite (best blog name hands down!) and friends. Some of you have displayed some gorgeous book covers, but surely I win the category of Most Unimaginative (or Most Minimal, depending on how you look at it). Please see cover above and weigh in.

At the expense of The Count of Monte Cristo, I read quite a bit of The Moonstone over the weekend and here are a few initial thoughts:

  • The is my first Wilkie Collins novel and know nothing about him other than his name is adorable.
  • I keep hearing that The Moonstone is supposed to be the first detective novel ever. Now up to Chapter 15, I don’t feel as if I’m reading a detective story. The mystery of The Moonstone and its so-called curse is intriguing, but it doesn’t feel very suspenseful. I guess the detective part is to come.
  • I recently enjoyed the epistolary format of Dracula, but so far the main narrator of the story has been Gabriel Betteredge, so I’m interested to know who we will hear from next.
  • I like Gabriel as a narrator. He is witty, smart and straight-forward. He has a grandfatherly air about him. He reminds me of a cross between Alfred (the loyal servant of Bruce Wayne/Batman) and Mr. Carson from Downton Abbey. I don’t have any particular feelings about any of the other characters yet.
  • I can’t believe there hasn’t been a TV adaptation of this famous novel since 1996. Apparently, there is a BBC adaptation that was supposed to be broadcast in 2012, but for whatever reasons they still have not released the series. Another Moonstone mystery … ha!

Moonstone

Advertisements

9 comments on “The Moonstone – Read-a-Long

  1. Juliana @ Epilogues
    November 4, 2013

    Jeez, behind already! I have to start this tonight. I also really like the letter format in Dracula – I think it’s easier to get into the story that way.

    I read The Woman in White this summer, and it switched narration a few times. Just when I would get used to one character, another one would take the reins for a while. Maybe the Moonstone will do that, too?

    Maybe I should just starting reading haha. Glad you’re liking it so far!

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      November 5, 2013

      Ha ha … Did you start the book yet? I felt the switching between characters was fairly smooth in Dracula, but to me all of the characters in that book were fairly homogeneous and interchangeable. It will be interesting to see what the transition is like in The Moonstone.

      Like

      • Juliana @ Epilogues
        November 5, 2013

        Just started today! Only about thirty pages in so far. It’s interesting!

        You’re right, Dracula was incredibly smooth. Stoker was really good at hopping from person to person! We’ll have to see how this one stacks up. 🙂

        Like

  2. Riv @ Bookish Realm
    November 5, 2013

    No way – I thought of Carson too when reading Betteredge’s narrative (which I just finished last night). Some other characters are also quite intriguing. If the BBC adaption ever gets done, I definitely want to watch it.

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      November 5, 2013

      Not sure why they shelved the adaptation as there doesn’t seem to be any news since they announced the project back in 2012.

      Like

  3. lauratfrey
    November 5, 2013

    Haha I am totally second guessing myself now, I’m reading four books at once and it’s not working out so well 🙂 But I will press onwards!

    Your cover is pretty boring. My ereader freebie is a portrait of Wilkie himself, so it’s a little more interesting.

    I love Betteredge too! I think of him as a smarter Grandpa Simpson: “This story isn’t so much interesting as it is long” and such.

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      November 5, 2013

      Four books? Wow, you rock! Yes, I agree … press on! It’ll work out.

      Ha! I love picturing Grandpa Simpson narrating the story and then forgetting who he’s doing.

      Like

  4. Ellie Baggley
    November 5, 2013

    I really hope they do air a BBC adaptation, that would be amazing. Betteredge is amazing, so witty and oldmanish and I really just want to give him a hug and read Robinson Crusoe in his company 😀

    And yes, his name is adorable. Happy reading!

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      November 5, 2013

      Is this your first time reading the book? I would be completely fine if Betteredge narrated the entire story. I can’t imagine switching gears and hearing from another character.

      Like

Thoughts? Comments?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on November 4, 2013 by in Headlines and tagged , .

Now reading

and …

and …

%d bloggers like this: