ebookclassics

2016 Book Blogger Discussion Challenge – Word up!

2016-Discussion-Challenge

You’ve probably all seen articles about how reading books is good for your health and makes you more empathetic, blah blah, etc. etc. While I’m sure it’s all true, one reward I find about reading is the opportunity to build on my vocabulary and to learn new words. Since my brain is terrible at retaining this kind of information, I’ve been trying to write down the words and their definition. Here are a few words I’ve recently picked-up courtesy of To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf:

crepuscular
1 : of, relating to, or resembling twilight : dim
2 : occurring or active during twilight

asperity
1: rigor, severity
2: a : roughness of surface : unevenness; also : a tiny projection from a surface; b : roughness of sound
3: roughness of manner or of temper : harshness

Will I ever use any of these words in real life? Doubtful. But as a reader of classics, I may stumble upon them again and then have a better idea of the meaning of the word in context to the story at that particular moment.

Now it’s your turn! In the comment section, tell me a word (or words) you’ve learned from reading books.

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33 comments on “2016 Book Blogger Discussion Challenge – Word up!

  1. Tanya Patrice
    February 1, 2016

    I totally agree – eBooks especially are helping to build my vocabulary. When I read a physical book though – it’s rare that I’ll look up a word, or even note it down.

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      February 2, 2016

      Thank you! I completely forgot to mention how much I like having the option to look up a word in my ebook. 99% of the time I won’t leave a physical book to look up a book because I’m 100% lazy.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Terri M., the Director
    February 1, 2016

    The reading I app I JUST discovered keeps track of the words I look up. So when I finish a book I can create an ePub of all the words. 🙂

    Like

  3. jennielyse
    February 1, 2016

    I recently learned about crepuscular too, but not through Virginia Woolf. I was watching something about cats, lol.

    Like

  4. Aj @ Read All The Things!
    February 1, 2016

    When I took the GRE test to get into graduate school, both of those words were in my test-prep book. I did horrible on the test, but learning all of those obscure words did help with understanding classics. 🙂

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      February 2, 2016

      Sorry to hear about the test, but glad you eventually found learning the words useful. I’m not surprised to find these words in literature, but can’t imagine anyone saying them to me.

      Like

  5. Naomi
    February 1, 2016

    That would be a nice thing about an e-book, wouldn’t it? There are always words I don’t know (it’s surprising, actually), but I don’t write them down, and I can’t remember any off the top of my head. I do sometimes look them up, though, so I hope I will at least remember them when I come across them again. 🙂

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      February 2, 2016

      I wish I could remember more words that I do make the effort to look-up. My hope is writing them down will make them stick to my brain somehow.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Naomi
        February 2, 2016

        There did used to be a time when I wrote them down, but that didn’t last very long. I wasn’t interested enough to take the time out from reading. I do like the idea of it, though.

        Like

  6. Brian Joseph
    February 2, 2016

    I love finding new and unusual words in books. For a while I was keeping track of them. I should start again.

    I may have heard the word “crepuscular” before in relation to animals that come out at dusk.

    I think that reading has improved my vocabulary immensely.

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      February 2, 2016

      The classics are definitely a good place to find unusual words. I’m positive reading is improving my vocabulary, although my pronunciation of these new words is questionable.

      Like

  7. TJ @ MyBookStrings
    February 2, 2016

    I looked up crepuscular while reading To the Lighthouse, too! 🙂 And during my lunch break today, I learned that “smut” means not only “dirty language” and “smudge,” but also “disease-causing fungus” (that’s from the intro to Roughing It in the Bush).

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      February 2, 2016

      Awesome! I knew I shouldn’t have skipped the introduction. Maybe it will pop up later in the book.

      Like

  8. lauratfrey
    February 3, 2016

    I can’t think of one, though I’m sure there are many. I wish Kobo kept track of words I’ve looked up. I wish I kept track of things I’ve Googled or Wikipedia’d while reading. I’ve been thinking about that, how the ease of access to Wikipedia changes how we read novels – when I read historical fiction, I get sucked into the “real” history all the time.

    There are also plenty of words I know from reading but have no idea how to pronounce.

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      February 4, 2016

      Okay, good it’s not just me. Actually I’m pretty bad when it comes to looking up historical information or facts too. I just can’t seem to tear myself away from the book. I’ll try to remember to look things up later, but of course this method doesn’t always work.

      Like

  9. Jen@Books That Hook
    February 3, 2016

    I read a book where it mentioned switchbacks. I had no idea what a switchback was. I thought it was some kind of ape (lol, just kidding). I had to look it up. I actually used that word one time as a vocabulary word of the day. I used to post those a lot, but stopped doing it because I didn’t know if people were interested or not.

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      February 4, 2016

      I feel like switchback goes with ape somehow too. Or is it razorback? I actually like when bloggers have word of the day posts, but again it’s a matter of remembering the word.

      Like

  10. Pingback: Week 21: Brave New World by Aldous Huxley | The Book-A-Week Project

  11. You’ve put me on the spot, and now I can’t think of a single word I’ve learned, haha. But I love when books have little bits of other languages in them because it expands my foreign language vocabulary. (Kindles come in very handy for these things since all you have to do is highlight the word or sentence!)

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      February 4, 2016

      Ooh, that’s a good point. I didn’t think about words in foreign languages. If it’s French or Spanish, I usually try to figure out what the words mean.

      Like

  12. DoingDewey
    February 4, 2016

    The ability to look up definitions immediately is one of my favorite things about ebooks 🙂 I’ve actually gotten to use the word crepuscular much more frequently than I would have guessed, talking about animals that are active at dawn and dusk, but I’m sure there are other words I’ve picked up that I’ve never gotten to use and probably wouldn’t pronounce properly if I did!

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      February 4, 2016

      Who knew crespuscular was such a common word? From the discussions in this post, I will probably remember the world forever now.

      Like

  13. Sara@LibraryHuntress
    February 5, 2016

    From The Black Dahlia, by James Ellroy: Zoot Suit, lol. Oh, and Donkey Show, but don’t google that one, trust me :p

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      February 6, 2016

      Ha! I’m curious about Donkey Show now, but I’ll take your word for it. 🙂

      Like

  14. Classics are great for expanding our vocabularies. I don’t keep track of words I learn (I confess that I rarely look words up), but this is a fun idea!

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      February 12, 2016

      If I learn at least learn 10 new words this year, I think that would be an accomplishment.

      Like

  15. jpschaper
    February 12, 2016

    I learn a lot of new words from reading books. I started a new feature on the blog–a newsletter of sorts–that includes a vocabulary word in each edition. The last word I used was supercilious, which was used in a Catherine Coulter book several times.

    Like

    • ebookclassics
      February 16, 2016

      I’ll have to check out your newsletter. Supercilious is a word I’ve seen a lot, but don’t really know the meaning. So I guess I’ll go look it up right now!

      Like

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